Lollapalooza 2019: Jade Bird and Men I Trust in review

Jade Bird performs at Lollapalooza 2019 (YouTube.com)

It’s like you’re sleeping and dreaming one of the happiest dreams you’ve had in awhile, leaving you to wake rested, and sad that it’s not real. That’s the feeling Men I Trust delivers on the Lake Shore stage Saturday afternoon at Lollapalooza. The sun beats down on a crowd donning a range of materials that one couldn’t imagine wearing facing this direction. But the audience was a combination of those who drifted over alone and fell straight into the soul of Montreal’s Men I Trust, and those who came to dance with friends, clad in 90s fashion.

The band is composed of bassist and guitarist Jessy Caron, keyboardist Dragos Chiriac and guitarist and vocalist Emma Proulx. This band was discovered by Tyler, the Creator, and broke out during the rapper’s annual music festival, Camp Flog Gnaw (Maxamillion Polo, onestowatch.com). They’ve been dubbed an electro-pop, indie band, and it’s obvious where that categorization is derived. It’s almost like lounge music – music with which one can ease into the day.

Lollapalooza’s placement of Men I Trust here makes good sense for that reason. Festival goers’ batteries are still close to full, and they have plenty of time to stay charged up before their choices in headliners.

A group of three made each other laugh as they joked about dancing seriously, while a twosome waved their arms in the air as though in a sky with diamonds.

This set ended five minutes earlier than scheduled, leaving some of us bereft of that one “encore” goodbye. But it permitted those who were done with the direct sun, to head a different direction. I was one of those.

Initially popping a squat as I waited under the trees, a few hundred feet from the American Eagle stage, I relaxed my legs on some uneven mulch. Not having to stand was a saving grace. But then, Jade Bird hit the stage with booming vocals and a racing guitar.

That’s after spending a few minutes past start time to finish setting up, and having to restart the song due to a screeching mic. But once she did, I was raised from my seat in the shade, and summoned close to the stage, where the sun shot down on a sweating crowd again.

Jade Bird is just that good. The English singer didn’t waste much time between songs to yap. She trudged on, and on, and on, until the very last second of her scheduled set end. At 3:25, she said something like, “OK, guys, this is my last six minutes, so let’s not waste another second,” and strummed directly into “Going Gone.”

During her two or three brief interludes, Jade shared that she wasn’t under the influence of any drugs, but that she was becoming tongue-tied and overexcited. She admitted that wearing a cool looking royal blue velvet suit wasn’t the appropriate attire on this day.

It’s just plain cool to watch artists realizing their success and sharing that joy in front of Chicago’s very eyes at Lollapalooza.

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