A Tribute to New Year’s Day Good Fortune Traditions

Aisha Mbengue sifts black-eyed peas along with other workers at Kumba, a small business that transforms the peas into flour, in Dakar, Senegal Friday, Sept. 24, 2010. To address its increasingly insecure food situation, Senegal is looking to a crop from its past, the cowpea, known more commonly in the U.S. as the black-eyed pea. Businesses like Kumba are marketing locally-produced cowpea flour as a less-expensive base for bread and Senegalese dishes traditionally made with pricey imported wheat. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)Aisha Mbengue sifts black-eyed peas along with other workers at Kumba, a small business that transforms the peas into flour, in Dakar, Senegal Friday, Sept. 24, 2010. To address its increasingly insecure food situation, Senegal is looking to a crop from its past, the cowpea, known more commonly in the U.S. as the black-eyed pea. Businesses like Kumba are marketing locally-produced cowpea flour as a less-expensive base for bread and Senegalese dishes traditionally made with pricey imported wheat. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Dave Hoekstra, along with Chicago songstress and comedian Molly McGown, welcome Chef Catherine Lambrecht of Greater Midwest Foodways, Charla Draper (formerly of Ebony magazine), and Author Donna Pierce into the studio as they pay tribute to the New Year’s Day Good Fortune Tradition of Black Eyed Peas. The women discuss the history of the black eyed peas and how they grew to become a believed staple of good fortune; other traditions that are believed to bring good luck; and much more.