Bones found likely to belong to Amelia Earhart, opens opportunity for evidence in cold case

Chris Williamson working on a podcast. (Photo courtesy of Chasing Earhart/Chris Williamson)

A Tennessee anthropologist is 99 percent sure he found Amelia Earhart’s bones based on a 1940 study that only used measurements. This study one said that the bones belonged to a man. Amelia Earhart expert Chris Williamson, who runs is even skeptical about the findings. It’s such a “bold statement,” he says. However, this software that was developed to re-analyze Earhart’s bones, is really the “meat and potatoes” in terms of new evidence.

The disappearance of Earhart has been an ongoing investigation for 81 years. Over time, there have been many hypothesis.  One theory is that Earhart and Fred Noonan may have went off course, ran out of fuel and landed on a small Pacific island. Other theories believe that they may have been trapped or stranded there and the plane was swept into the sea. One aviation icon disputed the idea about Earhart’s plane being washing into the sea. Williamson explain that this could be “circumstantial evidence,” since the island was previously inhabited. The government is sticking to the “crash and sink” philosophy, even though the government has classified documents on Earhart that still haven’t been released. Williamson says the government has denied many FOIA requests that have come through regarding the classified documents.  Based on what information the government is holding a secret, Williamson says that it could possibly alter history.  “Their fate in uncertain, and Chasing Earhart wants the mystery to die but the legacy to live.”

For more information on Chris and his team’s work, check out his podcast and social media.