Director of a new report on TSA security finds some room for improvement

CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 02:  Travelers are screened by Transportation Security Administration (TSA) workers at a security check point at O'Hare Airport on June 2, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The Department of Homeland Security said that the acting head of the TSA would be replaced following a report that airport screeners failed to detect explosives and weapons in nearly all of the tests that an undercover team conducted at airports around the country.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 02: Travelers are screened by Transportation Security Administration (TSA) workers at a security check point at O'Hare Airport on June 2, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The Department of Homeland Security said that the acting head of the TSA would be replaced following a report that airport screeners failed to detect explosives and weapons in nearly all of the tests that an undercover team conducted at airports around the country. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The Director of Homeland Security and Justice Issues for Congress’ General Accounting Office, Jennifer Grover joins Roe Conn and Anna Davlantes to explain a new report that sheds some light on how the Transportation Security Administration tests its screeners. The report was a response to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Inspector General’s (IG) 2015 review of security protocol, wherein 95% of weapons were getting onboard planes. This new report finds some problems in how the TSA tests its own effectiveness.

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