Why Apple owes billions of euros and what it means to the U.S.

BERLIN, GERMANY - JUNE 21:  In this photo illustration a man removes Euro currency bills from a wallet on June 21, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. Eurozone finance ministers are currently seeking to find a solution to Greece's pressing debt problems, including the prospect of the country's inability to meet its financial obligations unless it gets a fresh, multi-billion Euro loan by July 1. Greece's increasing tilt towards bankruptcy is rattling worldwide financial markets, and leading economists warn that bankruptcy would endanger the stability of the Euro and have dire global consequences.  (Photo Illustration by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

BERLIN, GERMANY - JUNE 21: In this photo illustration a man removes Euro currency bills from a wallet on June 21, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. Eurozone finance ministers are currently seeking to find a solution to Greece's pressing debt problems, including the prospect of the country's inability to meet its financial obligations unless it gets a fresh, multi-billion Euro loan by July 1. Greece's increasing tilt towards bankruptcy is rattling worldwide financial markets, and leading economists warn that bankruptcy would endanger the stability of the Euro and have dire global consequences. (Photo Illustration by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Senior Vice President at Westwood in Dallas, Susan Schmidt joins Roe Conn and Anna Davlantes to explain why Apple owes the EU over 15 million euros and how it will impact US/EU relations.